Newsgroup: alt.support.crohns-colitis
Subject: Re: Kidney stones control?
From: Ron Hoggan
Date: Sat, 02 Nov 1996 03:18:16 GMT

The condition of some kidney stones is asserted to be the result of 
abnormal calcium deposition in the kidneys, in _Renal Physiology_
by Arthur Vander, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1975. On pages 127-128, it says:
"The increased plasma calcium is deposited in various body tissues 
including the kidneys, where stones are formed." Abnormal 
calcium metabolism is very common in celiac disease. 
Chronic production of kidney stones should be cause to consider being 
tested for celiac disease. 

Even if some drugs, such as Allopurinol, provide relief from the stones, 
they do not treat the underlying pathology. If occult celiac disease is 
at the root of the chronic production of kidney stones, which is a 
distinct possibility, a positive outcome is likely, as it is usually a very
treatable condition. For those with Crohn's or IBD, testing for 
antiendomysium antibodies might reveal associated celiac disease. 

Because of the genetic connections which have been demonstrated between 
celiac disease and Crohn's, the possibility of kidney stones in Crohn's 
seems likely. 

I hope that is helpful.
Best Wishes,

Ron Hoggan

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Subject: Kidney Disease
From: Ron Hoggan
Date: 02 Nov 1996

The condition of kidney stones is asserted to be the result of abnormal 
calcium deposition in the kidneys, in _Renal Physiology_ by Arthur 
Vander, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1975. On pages 127-128, it says:
The increased plasma calcium is deposited in various body tissues 
including the kidneys, where stones are formed." Abnormal calcium 
metabolism is very common in celiac disease. 

There is an interesting convergence, here. The antireticulin antibody (ARA)
although it is not always found in the blood of an active celiac, is 
100% predictive of celiac disease. Therefore, if a person has kidney 
stones, the ARA and the anti-endomysium antibody tests seem a prudent 
measure. Celiac disease may, on the basis of these tests, be positively 
diagnosed, and a negative result would be very, very likely to rule out 
active celiac disease. 

Problems with the liver would also suggest such testing. As the ARA 
attacks the structural tissues of the kidney and the liver, such a course 
seems imminently sensible. 

In a recent post from a woman who is on dialysis, as a result of 
polycystic kidney disease, she revealed that she had been diagnosed with 
celiac disease as a child, but was subsequently told that she had grown 
out of it, so she resumed a regular diet during adolescence. As memory 
serves, she developed her kidney disease, in her twenties, and she was 
wondering if I thought there might be a connection. (She had read an 
article I had posted on a newsgroup.) I suggested that she resume the 
gluten-free diet. I haven't heard back from her since. That was some 
months ago.  

She is in her mid-thirties. I wonder when the information that celiac 
disease is a life-long condition is going to filter into the general 
practice of medicine? Dr. Dicke's discovery of an effective therapy is 
now 50 years old. What, exactly, is the renewal rate of medical
information?  

Sincerely,
Ron Hoggan